Apparently, I do. I tried to find this Hawaiian brunch delicacy in local restaurants via an internet search and by talking to locals, and nobody has it. What? ‘Sup wi’dat? This borders on culinary larceny!

A loco moco challenge is at the bottom of this article.

So just in case there’s somebody out there that doesn’t know what this delicious and very nutritious dish is, here’s what you need to know. Here is a picture of a loco moco as served in the Aqua Cafe in Honolulu. It is missing something critical, but it does show how they’re assembled. It’s on the right.

Hamburger loco moco at Aqua Cafe, Honolulu

Hamburger loco moco at Aqua Cafe, Honolulu

The problem with the one above is it isn’t smothered in gravy! Ouch. Here’s one I had for breakfast.

Loco Moco Brunchfast

Loco Moco Brunchfast

Now, the beauty of loco moco consumption is to get the right ingredients – sticky rice, lo-fat content beef patty, one or two eggs over medium (or well done for the squeamish). Don’t skimp on the gravy! Getting gallons of gravy in a can from Costco is wrong on so many levels! It should be prepared fresh and slathered on each layer as it is assembled so that everything is immersed. It probably costs less than a dollar for the ingredients.

Substitutions are plentiful – in Hawaii it is common to use spam, kalua pork, fish, and chicken. It’s all pretty good.

What about that sticky rice? Well, that can be hard to find in small towns. It is a glutinous rice that sticks together after cooking. If you find Thai Sweet Rice on the shelf, grab some. Follow the cooking instructions exactly. Very good for sushi and loco mocos though maybe not so popular in the current banal glutin-free world. For folks who are truly glutin-intolerant a very good alternate is Calrose US #1 extra fancy rice. It is non-alergenic and glutin-free.

Now I don’t want a bunch of people showing up for breakfast/brunch, so here is a challenge to all Okanogan Valley restaurants: Add this as a week-end special just to see if it generates interest, let us know you have it available in the comments, and we will do a photo review. Be the first but don’t be the last establishment to adopt this interesting and delicious meal!

 

We stopped into the Pastime Bar and Grill for the inaugural Sunday Brunch menu and caught Tim at work churning out omelets. The process is new but the results are good old fashion. And my omelet was awesome!

The process is simple – you tell Tim what to put in the omelet and he cooks it up. The options are cheeses (cheddar, sharp or mild, or Monterrey Jack), meats (crumbled sausage, bacon, or ham), and veggies which include red and green bell peppers, green and white onions, jalapeƱos, tomatoes, and spinach. Basic omelet craft follows and at the last minute Tim throws in a dash of secret spice and hands you a plate with your omelet.

Under the lid of the hot tray lurks a big pile of hobo spuds – this is a blend of what ever has been cooking in the kitchen and includes home-style fried, and hash brown spuds and more. Pretty much what ever one might find in the tucker bags at a hobo camp, simple, and cooked right.

The omelet line

The omelet line

Where the magic happens

Where the magic happens

Master Chef Tim Naillon readying his tools

Master Chef Tim Naillon readying his tools

Commence!

Commence!

First customer!

First customer!

More of this, more of that!

More of this, more of that!

My omelet and hobo spuds - Delicious!

My omelet and hobo spuds – Delicious!

The menu includes more than omelets so if you prefer something else with your coffee, Bloody Mary or Mimosa they have it.