Beautiful Cozy Cottage BnB in the Okanogan

Had a chance to talk with Valerie Barker Braman about the conversion of the beautiful cottage they built to a BnB, associated with the Air BnB agency. I know Rick’s wood working skills are tops – I’ve seen the results, so it’s no surprise to know their BnB customers are quick to write glowing reviews of the facilities, the area (Aeneas Valley) and of course the hosts.

If you have friends or family that would like to visit the area and experience the fullness of Okanogan beauty it is easy to recommend Val and Rick. Visit their AirBnB page to see what they offer and the warm reviews. This is a very nice local success story and we congratulate the Bramans for their great contribution to the Okanogan experience.

https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/25941667

Here’s a preview.

Treasure Hunt!

There’s more – the hosts have added a fun treasure hunt complete with maps, hidden clues, and pirates! Guests use the treasure map to find clues to the treasure chest, where they get to take home handmade plunder!

Old Oroville seen through a new lens

I have this old photo of Oroville, Washington on my computer and it has always been of interest because it shows Oroville from about the same viewing angle as where I live. There are some buildings and features that are well documented and some still exist, though changed with time. Yesterday I happened to be viewing this image along with a set of newer images and was suddenly dumbstruck by something I’d overlooked earlier. A house in the old photo is still there, and the angle of reference was remarkably similar to what I can see looking out my window. Clearly the person who took that photo was standing very near then to where I am today. Here is the older photo looking southeast toward Oroville’s old downtown.

Here is a more recent photo taken from the deck of our home.

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More About Glacial Erratics

Two of my favorite Washington State erratics are not even in Washington – but they were. They’re now down in Oregon, south of Portland, and how they got there… Well, there’s a story I’d like to tell.

Perhaps the most exotic and unlikely erratic in the world got started on its journey a long time ago from a place in the dark emptiness between the stars. It is not only an erratic, it is an iron-nickel meteorite, and it is big. It is the largest such traveler in North America and is a member of the top-ten largest meteorites in the world. We can’t know where or when it fell to Earth as there is no tell-tale crater near it today, so we’ll pick up it’s journey 13,000 years ago when Lake Missoula was formed in Washington, Idaho, and Montana. That lake is going to need an introduction for this tale to make sense.

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